Rules For The Revolution: The Podcast

Answering your questions about podcasting, new media and the law.

Archive for the 'Defamation' Category

Episode 016: Rights of Publicity, Privacy (Part II)

Welcome to Rules for the Revolution. Click on this link to listen to Episode 016 or subscribe and listen through iTunes

SHOW NOTES

Host: Colette Vogele

Guest: Gregory Alan Rutchik, Esq.
Gregory Rutchik, the founder of the arts and technology law group, specializes in infringement litigation. You can find Gregory in San Francisco and Santa Monica, California, and on the internet at www.rutchik.com. Gregory is currently finishing a book from the “entreporneur” series, which will be available at the end of this summer on the topic of publicity and privacy rights.

Links for this Episode

  • Rutchik’s blog entry about 2257 Statute
  • 18 U.S.C. 2257 (Record Keeping Requirements for adult content)
  • Internet Law Treatise (from EFF) on Right of Publicity
  • Section 3344 and 3344.1 of California Civil Code
  • Wordpress plug in
  • Podcasting Legal Guide on Right of Publicty
  • As always, you can reference the The Podcasting Legal Guide: Rules for the Revolution for more information on legal questions related to podcasting.

    Credits: Benjamin A. Costa, Legal and Production. Music for this episode is licensed from Magnatune. (Artist: Burnshee Thornside; Album: The Art Of Not Blending In; Song: Can I Be A Star.) Special thanks to Creative Commons and Alex Roberts for the logo design, and to Bill Streeter for getting this site designed and rolling for us.

    Feedback: We would very much like to hear from you and get your feedback on this new podcast series. Things you like, don’t like, or questions you have that you’d like answered in a future episode are welcome. Please send us your feedback and questions by emailing us at colette [at] rulesfortherevolution [dot] com or by calling our listener comment line at 206-948-1455 Note new number!!.

    Licensing:


    Creative Commons License

    The original content of this podcast is licensed under a
    Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to “Colette Vogele, Rules for the Revolution: The Podcast”. For information on commercial use, please contact colette [at] vogelelaw [dot] com.

    4 comments

    Episode 015: Right of Publicity, Privacy (Part I)

    Welcome to Rules for the Revolution. Click on this link to listen to Episode 015 or subscribe and listen through iTunes

    SHOW NOTES

    Host: Colette Vogele

    Guest: Gregory Alan Rutchik, Esq.
    Gregory Rutchik, the founder of the arts and technology law group, specializes in infringement litigation. You can find Gregory in San Francisco and Santa Monica, California, and on the internet at www.rutchik.com. Gregory is perfect for today’s topic because he’s currently writing a book which will be available at the end of this summer on the topic of publicity and privacy rights.

    Links for this Episode

  • Internet Law Treatise (from EFF) on Right of Publicity
  • Section 3344 and 3344.1 of California Civil Code
  • Practitioner’s Guide to Right of Publicity
  • ALI Restatement (Third) of Unfair Competition
  • Paris Hilton/moving storage case summary from the law firm Latham & Watkins
  • Discussion of Paris Hilton case on Patry Copyright Blog
  • As always, you can reference the The Podcasting Legal Guide: Rules for the Revolution for more information on legal questions related to podcasting.

    Credits: Benjamin A. Costa, Legal and Production Intern. Music for this episode is licensed from Magnatune. (Artist: Burnshee Thornside; Album: The Art Of Not Blending In; Song: Can I Be A Star.) Special thanks to Creative Commons and Alex Roberts for the logo design, and to Bill Streeter for getting this site designed and rolling for us.

    Feedback: We would very much like to hear from you and get your feedback on this new podcast series. Things you like, don’t like, or questions you have that you’d like answered in a future episode are welcome. Please send us your feedback and questions by emailing us at colette [at] rulesfortherevolution [dot] com or by calling our listener comment line at 206-350-5738.

    Licensing:


    Creative Commons License

    The original content of this podcast is licensed under a
    Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to “Colette Vogele, Rules for the Revolution: The Podcast”. For information on commercial use, please contact colette [at] vogelelaw [dot] com.

    Comments are off for this post

    Episode 009: Section 230 – a powerful code for free speech

    Click on this link to listen to Episode 009 or subscribe and listen through iTunes

    SHOW NOTES

    Host: Colette Vogele

    Guest: Kurt Opsahl, Staff Attorney, Electronic Frontier Foundation

    Opsahl interview

    Kurt’s work at the EFF focuses on civil liberties, free speech and privacy law. Before joining EFF, Opsahl worked at Perkins Coie, where he represented technology clients with respect to intellectual property, privacy, defamation, and other online liability matters. Kurt also has past affiliations as research fellow to Professor Pamela Samuelson at the U.C. Berkeley School of Information Management & Systems. Kurt also co-authored the Electronic Media and Privacy Law Handbook.

    Topics for Episode 009: In today’s episode, we discuss with Kurt Opsahl the background of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. Kurt describes the congressional goals of the the CDA, a piece of the lengthly telecom legislation passed in 1996. Since its passage, other sections of the CDA have been struck down under constitutional challenges. Section 230, however, thrives today by providing fairly broad protection for intermediaries of content on the internet, which often includes podcasters (as well as eBay, Google, Yahoo!, and many more…).

    Links for this Episode

  • CDA sectin 230
  • ACLU v. Reno case materials
  • EFF’s blogger’s FAQ on section 230
  • EFF’s FAQ on on-line defamation
  • EFF’s case archive re: section 230 casees
  • As always, you can reference the The Podcasting Legal Guide: Rules for the Revolution for more information on legal questions related to podcasting.

    Credits: Benjamin A. Costa, Legal and Production Intern. Music for this episode is licensed from Magnatune. (Artist: Burnshee Thornside; Album: The Art Of Not Blending In; Song: Can I Be A Star.) Special thanks to Creative Commons and Alex Roberts for the logo design, and to Bill Streeter for getting this site designed and rolling for us.

    Feedback: We would very much like to hear from you and get your feedback on this new podcast series. Things you like, don’t like, or questions you have that you’d like answered in a future episode are welcome. Please send us your feedback and questions by emailing us at colette [at] rulesfortherevolution [dot] com or by calling our listener comment line at 206-350-5738.

    Licensing:
    The original content of this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 License. Please attribute legal copies of this work to “Colette Vogele, Rules for the Revolution: The Podcast”.
    Creative Commons License

    4 comments